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my corner - serial numbers

Some terminologies I like to use when describing the serial numbers of a particular banknote:-

A/1 000001 = First note (rare and highly sought after too)
A/1 000050 = Low serial number
A/1 222222 = Solid number
A/1 123321 = Radar number
A/1 123456 = Ascending order number
A/1 654321 = Descending order number
A/1 000008 = Lucky/golden number
A/1 000088 = Double lucky number
A/1 000888 = Triple lucky number aka half solid
A/1 008888 = Death lucky number
A/1 088888 = Not so lucky number
A/1 888888 = Solid lucky number (what more do you want?)
A/1 000004 = Death number
A/1 100000 = Thousand number/million number
A/1 000000 = No face value number (not specimen type)**
A/1 101010 = Binary number aka repeat number
A/1 100100 = Repeat number (not radar)
A/1 010199 = Birthday number

From the above, I have not used the description "almost solid" numbered notes. Every serial number is unique but almost or second best is not one should be proud of. Please feel free to let me know if you can add further to this. Thanks

Note: **. This is not a specimen note unless it is said so. Serial numbers of notes are usually printed in reverse order and this is simply just the last number of the print for that particular prefix. These sort of notes are normally not issued, but in Australia, the Reserve Bank on sold such note (in a sheet of 40) to the highest bidder and you can find such notes for sales in thousand of dollars each in un circulated condition.

30/3/14

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